Pink Tiger Lily photo from Pxfuel

Many of us fret about our clothes. We worry that they aren’t stylish enough, or that they make us look fat, or that they’re last year’s (or even last millennium’s) fashions.

Some of us even worry that we won’t have enough money to buy the basic clothes we need.

But we shouldn’t be anxious that God won’t provide for us. After all, look how He’s clothed the flowers.

Have you ever marvelled at the rich “vestments” some flowers are clad in?

Look at the iris attired in silky frills, the peony robed in ruffles, or the delicate tracery of Queen Anne’s lace. The sumptuous, constantly unfurling petals of the rose boast the finest tailoring. Some flowers are decked out in speckles, mimicking the polka-dots on a dress; others are costumed in stripes, like a crocus. Even the common petunia can have petals that resemble luxurious velvet.

Red Rose photo by AliceKeyStudio on Pixabay

God hasn’t stinted on giving flowers rich colours, either. What about the intense blue of lobelia, suitable for any royal robe? Or the bright yellows of daffodils, the vivid oranges of marigolds, or the saturated reds of poppies? On the paler end of the spectrum are the shy blues of the forget-me-nots and the delicate ballet-pinks of some tulips.

Some flowers even have names which relate to clothing: bachelor’s buttons, lady’s slipper, Texas bluebonnet, foxglove, lady’s mantle, and monk’s hood.

And how about those lilies? In fact, I seem to remember a Bible verse which talks about the beautiful garments lilies wear:

“So why do you worry about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin, yet I say to you that even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.” (Matthew 6:28-29 NKJV)

Jesus is referring here to King Solomon. He was a fabulously wealthy and wise king of ancient Israel, who reigned from 970 to 931 BC. He received 25 tons of gold during each year of his reign, and his net worth in modern terms is estimated to have been in the trillions of dollars. He certainly could have afforded the most lavish clothing, bedecked with jewels and woven with gold thread.

And yet Jesus says that even the wealthiest king’s robes can’t hold a candle to the exquisite raiment that God has given an ephemeral lily.

Painting of King Solomon,
Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

“If that is how God clothes the grass of the field, which is here today and tomorrow is thrown into the fire, will he not much more clothe you—you of little faith?” (Matthew 6:30 NIV)

We have a heavenly Father who is not only rich in love and mercy, He has abundant provision available for His children. He not only owns the cattle on a thousand hills, He owns the entire universe. We can trust that He’s able and willing to provide us with any material thing that we need, whether it’s clothing, food, or housing.

“I was young and now am old, yet I have never seen the righteous forsaken or their children begging bread.” (Psalm 37:25 NIV)

God will see to it that we have whatever we need to live: we don’t need to fret. Our job is to put Him first in our lives and focus on our relationship with Him: when we do that, everything else will fall into place. Jesus said:

“Seek the Kingdom of God above all else, and live righteously, and he will give you everything you need.” (Matthew 6:33 NLT)

So let’s not be anxious about our clothes or anything else: God will make sure His children are provided for. After all, even the most expensive designer clothes are no match for the beauty of a wildflower that God created in the blink of an eye.

If you’re tempted to fret about something you need, consider the lilies and their message of God’s lavish supply.

© 2020 Lori J. Cartmell. All rights reserved.

2 thoughts on “Consider the Lilies

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s